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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Time Trends in Fast Food Consumption and Its Association with Obesity among Children in China

TitleTime Trends in Fast Food Consumption and Its Association with Obesity among Children in China
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsXue, H, Wu, Y, Wang, X, Wang, Y
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Paginatione0151141
ISBN Number1932-6203 (Electronic)1932-6203 (Linking)
Accession Number26974536
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Study the trends in Western fast food consumption (FFC) among Chinese school-age children and the association between FFC and obesity using nationwide survey data. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted to study the trends in FFC and the associations between FFC and weight status (overweight, obesity and body mass index (BMI) z-score). SETTING: Longitudinal data from families were collected in the 2004 and 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (covering nine provinces throughout China). SUBJECTS: The analysis included 2656 Chinese children aged 6 to 18 years (1542 and 1114 children in the 2004 and 2009 survey, respectively). RESULTS: FFC (reported having consumed Western fast food in the past three months) has increased between 2004 and 2009, from 18.5% to 23.9% in those aged 6-18, and increased more rapidly among those aged 13-17, from 17.9% to 26.3%. The increase was significant in almost all groups by age, sex, family income, and residence. Our cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses did not detect a significant association between FFC and obesity/overweight or BMI z-score (e.g., for BMI z-score, boys: beta = 0.02, 95% CI: -0.71, 0.75; girls: beta = -0.14, 95% CI: -1.03, 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: FFC has increased in Chinese school-age children, especially in older children, boys, and those from low- and medium-income families, rural areas, and East China, but decreased among those from high-income families during 2004-2009. The data did not show a significant association between FFC and obesity.

PMCID

PMC4790849