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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

The relationships among sexually transmitted infection, depression, and lifetime violence in a sample of predominantly African American women

TitleThe relationships among sexually transmitted infection, depression, and lifetime violence in a sample of predominantly African American women
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsLaughon, K, Gielen, AC, Campbell, JC, Burke, J, McDonnell, K, O'Campo, P
JournalResearch in nursing & health
Volume30
Pagination413-428
Date PublishedAug
ISBN Number0160-6891; 0160-6891
Accession Number17654476
KeywordsAdult, African Americans/ethnology, Attitude to Health/ethnology, Chi-Square Distribution, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression/complications/ethnology, Female, Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Services Needs and Demand, HIV Infections/complications/ethnology, Humans, Logistic Models, Mass Screening, Nursing Assessment, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Safe Sex, Self Care/methods/psychology, Sexually Transmitted Diseases/complications/ethnology, United States/epidemiology, Violence/ethnology
Abstract

This study was a secondary analysis of the relationships among lifetime experiences of violence, depressive symptoms, substance use, safer sex behaviors use, and past-year sexually transmitted infection (STI) treatment among a sample of 445 low income, primarily African American women (257 HIV-, 188 HIV+) reporting a male intimate partner within the past year. Twenty-one percent of HIV- and 33% of HIV+ women reported past-year STI treatment. Violence victimization increased women's odds of past-year STI treatment, controlling for HIV status and age. Depressive symptoms increased, and use of safer sex behaviors decreased, women's odds of past-year STI treatment. Results suggest that positive assessment for violence and/or depression indicates need for STI screening.