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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Like parent, like child: intergenerational transmission of partner violence in Cebu, the Philippines

TitleLike parent, like child: intergenerational transmission of partner violence in Cebu, the Philippines
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsFehringer, JA, Hindin, MJ
JournalThe Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Volume44
Pagination363-371
Date PublishedApr
ISBN Number1879-1972; 1054-139X
Accession Number19306795
KeywordsAdolescent, Domestic Violence/ethnology/statistics & numerical data, Family Characteristics, Female, Humans, Intergenerational Relations, Logistic Models, Male, Philippines, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study investigates the prevalence of partner violence perpetration and receipt among a sample of young men and women in the Philippines, as well as the relationship between witnessing interparental violence during childhood and current violence in partnerships. METHODS: We used 1994, 2002, and 2005 data from 472 married or cohabiting young adults from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey in Cebu, the Philippines. This is a longitudinal data set following more than 2000 Filipino women and their index children since the child's birth in 1983-1984. RESULTS: Prevalence of partner violence perpetration was 55.8% for female and 25.1% for male respondents. Prevalence of victimization was 27.7% for females and 30.5% for males. In all, 45% of females and 50% of males reported having witnessed their parents/caretakers physically hurt one another during childhood. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that witnessing interparental violence significantly predicted report of violent act victimization and reciprocal violent acts. Greater parental joint decision making and being male were independently associated with a lower risk of report of both reciprocal violent acts and violent act victimization. Duration of marriage or cohabitation was associated with report of violent act victimization and reciprocal violent acts. There were gender interaction effects for several factors, including mother's church attendance and household purchase of alcohol at age 11 years. CONCLUSIONS: Implications for further research and violence prevention programs include early intervention with adolescents and focus on gender differences in violence determinants.