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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Low-income African-American adults share weight status, food-related psychosocial factors and behaviours with their children

TitleLow-income African-American adults share weight status, food-related psychosocial factors and behaviours with their children
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsHan, E, Jones-Smith, J, Surkan, PJ, Kharmats, AY, Vedovato, GM, Trude, AC, Anderson Steeves, E, Gittelsohn, J
JournalObes Sci Pract
Volume1
Pagination78-87
Date PublishedDec
ISBN Number2055-2238
Accession Number27774251
KeywordsAdults, african-american, BMI, Childhood obesity
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine the extent to which low-income African-American children's weight status, psychosocial characteristics and food-related behaviours are associated with that of their adult caregivers. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from baseline evaluation of B'More Healthy Communities for Kids obesity prevention trial were used. Outcomes of interest were children's overweight and/or obesity status, food-related self-efficacy, knowledge, intentions and healthier/less healthy food acquisition scores. The primary exposures were adult caregiver's overweight and/or obesity status, their psychosocial factors and food acquisition scores. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. RESULTS: Children had higher odds of overweight or obesity if they had an overweight/obese caregiver (odds ratio [OR] 4.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.59-10.28) or an obese caregiver (OR 2.50, 95%CI 1.39-4.51). Having a caregiver in the highest quartile of self-efficacy, food intentions and healthy food acquisition patterns was associated with higher odds of their child also having a higher score on these factors (self-efficacy: OR 3.77 [95%CI 1.76-8.04]; food intentions: OR 1.13 [95%CI 1.01-1.27]; and healthy food acquisition: OR 2.19 [95%CI 1.05-4.54]). CONCLUSIONS: Child and adult caregiver weight status and psychosocial characteristics were positively associated in this low-income, urban population. These findings may help inform obesity treatment or prevention programmes and interventions aimed at parents and families.

PMCID

PMC5064723