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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Lifestyle factors associated with childhood obesity: a cross-sectional study in Shanghai, China

TitleLifestyle factors associated with childhood obesity: a cross-sectional study in Shanghai, China
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsLi, L, Shen, T, Wen, L, Wu, M, He, P, Wang, Y, Qu, W, Tan, H, He, G
JournalBMC Res Notes
Volume8
Pagination6
Date PublishedJan 17
ISBN Number1756-0500
Accession Number25595610
Abstract

BackgroundLimited research has been conducted to investigate factors associated with overweight and obesity of children in China, where obesity has been increasing. This study investigated associations of lifestyle factors with overweight or obesity among Chinese primary school-aged children.MethodsA cross-sectional survey was conducted with 2400 children aged 6 inverted question mark12 from 11 primary schools. Children completed a self-administered questionnaire assisted by their parents at home. The survey included questions on self-reported height and weight, screen time, physical activity, modes of travel to/from school, and dietary habits. Multilevel models were conducted to examine factors associated with overweight or obesity.Results15.2% of children were overweight and 10.9% were obese; nearly 80% of children spent inverted question mark2 hrs./day either on physical activities or screen time. Compared with those spent >3 hrs./day on screen time, children who spent inverted question mark2 hrs./day or between 2-3 hrs./day were significantly less likely to be obese after adjusting for other variables (AOR inverted question mark= inverted question mark0.34, 95%CI: 0.20-0.60, P inverted question mark< inverted question mark0.01; or AOR inverted question mark= inverted question mark0.41, 95%CI: 0.20-0.84, P inverted question mark= inverted question mark0.02 respectively). Children spent inverted question mark2 hrs./day on screen time were less likely to become overweight or obesity, compared with >3 hrs./day (AOR inverted question mark= inverted question mark0.62, 95%CI: 0.38-0.99, P inverted question mark< inverted question mark0.05).ConclusionsScreen time is independently associated with childhood obesity, and needs be focused for obesity prevention in school-aged children in China.

PMCID

Pmc4305265