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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Identifying barriers to move to better health coverage: preferences for health insurance benefits among the rural poor population in La Guajira, Colombia

TitleIdentifying barriers to move to better health coverage: preferences for health insurance benefits among the rural poor population in La Guajira, Colombia
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsAmaya, JL, Ruiz, F, Trujillo, AJ, Buttorff, C
JournalInt J Health Plann Manage
Volume31
Pagination126-38
Date PublishedJan-Mar
ISBN Number1099-1751 (Electronic)0749-6753 (Linking)
Accession Number25111823
Keywords*Insurance, Health/organization & administration/statistics & numerical data, Adult, Colombia, Consumer Behavior/*statistics & numerical data, Female, Financing, Government/organization & administration, health insurance benefits, health insurance coverage, Health Status, Humans, Insurance Coverage/organization & administration/*statistics & numerical data, insurance preferences, Male, rural healthcare, Rural Population/*statistics & numerical data, Socioeconomic Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

Even though access to health insurance in Colombia has improved since the implementation of the 1993 health reforms (Law 100), universal coverage has not yet been accomplished. There is still a segment of the population under the low-income (subsidized) health insurance policy or without health insurance altogether. The purpose of this research was to identify preferences and behavior regarding health insurance among the subsidized rural population in La Guajira, Colombia, and to understand why that population remains under the subsidized health insurance policy. The field experiment gathered information from 400 households regarding their socioeconomic situation, health conditions, and preferences for health insurance characteristics. Results suggest that the surveyed population gives priority to expanded family coverage, physician and hospital choice, and access to specialists, rather than to attributes associated with co-payments or premiums. That indicates that people value healthcare benefits and family coverage more than health insurance expenses, and policy makers could use these preferences to enroll subsidized population into the contributory regime.