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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Gender and Race Variations in the Intersection of Religious Involvement, Early Trauma, and Adult Health

TitleGender and Race Variations in the Intersection of Religious Involvement, Early Trauma, and Adult Health
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsReinert, KG, Campbell, JC, Bandeen-Roche, K, Sharps, P, Lee, J
JournalJ Nurs Scholarsh
Volume47
Pagination318-27
Date PublishedJul
ISBN Number1527-6546
Accession Number26077834
KeywordsAdventists, child abuse, community health, Cultural diversity, Culture, forgiveness, Gender differences, gratitude, Health disparities, Mental Health, neglect, Public Health, religious coping, religious involvement, spirituality, trauma, Violence
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine gender and race variations in regards to the influence of religious involvement (RI) as a moderator of the effects of early traumatic stress (ETS) on health-related quality of life among adult survivors of child abuse. DESIGN: A cross-sectional predictive design was used to study Seventh-day Adventist adults in North America (N = 10,283). METHODS: A secondary analysis of data collected via questionnaires was done using multiple regression. RESULTS: Data revealed that women had a significantly higher prevalence of any or all ETS subtypes, except for physical abuse prevalence, which was the same for both genders. Blacks reported a significantly higher prevalence of at least one ETS subtype than did Whites, except for neglect, where Whites had a higher prevalence. Exposure to at least one ETS subtype was associated with worse negative effect on mental health (B = -2.08, p < .0001 vs. B = -1.54, p < .0001) and physical health (B = -2.01, p < .0001 vs. B = -1.11, p < .0001) for women compared to men. Among those exposed to all ETS subtypes (n = 447), Whites had significant worse physical health, with White women having almost two times the negative effect on physical health (B = -4.50, p < .0001) than White men (B = -2.87, p < .05). As for RI moderation, based on tests of three-way interactions of race-RI-ETS, there were no associated differences. However, tests of three-way interactions of gender-RI-ETS showed a significant buffering effect. Among those with high levels of negative religious coping (RC), women exposed to ETS had significantly worse physical health (B = -1.28) than men. CONCLUSIONS: Results give evidence of gender and racial differences on the magnitude of the ETS-health effect, as well as gender differences in ETS-health buffering by RC. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Findings suggest gender and racial differences must be considered when devising holistic nursing interventions for improving health outcomes of early trauma survivors.

PMCID

Pmc4486635