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Factors Associated with Men’s Assessment of Prostate Cancer Treatment Choice

TitleFactors Associated with Men’s Assessment of Prostate Cancer Treatment Choice
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRoss, LE, Howard, DL, Bowie, JV, Thorpe, R. J., J, Kinlock, BL, Burt, C, Laveist, TA
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume31
Pagination301-307
Type of ArticleArticle
KeywordsDisparity, prostate cancer, Quality of Life, race, Survivorship, Treatment choice
Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine factors among a group of African American and White men in North Carolina and their assessment of prostate cancer treatment choice or belief that treatment chosen was best. A sample of men (N = 877) with a history of prostate cancer diagnosis was recruited from the North Carolina Cancer Registry during 2007–2008 and asked to participate in a telephone interview covering several measures about their initial prostate cancer treatment. Logistic regression was used to assess demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors on whether they felt that they had chosen the best treatment for the disease. Respondents were majority White (52.7 %), married (75.9 %), and had surgery (67.9 %) as their initial treatment. At the bivariate level, factors associated with the belief that the treatment chosen was best were as follows: White race/ethnicity, higher levels of education, a more recent treatment date, having health insurance coverage, type of treatment received, higher levels of bother from side effects, greater contentment with their quality of life, and doctor discussions of the various treatment options. Similarly, the multivariate analysis showed increased odds of belief that the treatment chosen was the best among demographic (i.e., race/ethnicity, level of education, and health insurance coverage) as well as psychosocial and clinical variables (i.e., greater bother from side effects, greater contentment with their quality of life, and initial treatment received). Results suggest that demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors play an important role for men in assessing their treatment choices for prostate cancer. © 2015, American Association for Cancer Education.