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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

The effect of income and occupation on body mass index among women in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys (1983-2002)

TitleThe effect of income and occupation on body mass index among women in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys (1983-2002)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsColchero, MA, Caballero, B, Bishai, D
JournalSocial science & medicine (1982)
Volume66
Pagination1967-1978
Date PublishedMay
ISBN Number0277-9536; 0277-9536
Accession Number18336975
KeywordsAdult, Age Factors, Body Mass Index, Exercise, Female, Health Surveys, Humans, Income/statistics & numerical data, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged, Occupations/statistics & numerical data, Time Factors, Women, Working/statistics & numerical data
Abstract

We assessed the effects of changes in income and occupational activities on changes in body weight among 2952 non-pregnant women enrolled in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys between 1983 and 2002. On average, body mass index (BMI) among women occupied in low activities was 0.29 kg/m(2) (standard error 0.11) larger compared to women occupied in heavy activities. BMI among women involved in medium activities was on average 0.12 kg/m(2) (standard error 0.05) larger compared to women occupied in heavy activities. A one-unit increase in log household income in the previous survey was associated with a small and positive change in BMI of 0.006 kg/m(2) (standard error 0.02) but the effect was not significant. The trend of increasing body mass was higher in the late 1980s than during the 1990s. These period effects were stronger for the women who were younger at baseline and for women with low or medium activity levels. Our analysis suggests a trend in the environment over the last 20 years that has increased the susceptibility of Filipino women to larger body mass.