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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Disentangling race and social context in understanding disparities in chronic conditions among men

TitleDisentangling race and social context in understanding disparities in chronic conditions among men
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsThorpe, R. J., J, Bell, CN, Kennedy-Hendricks, A, Harvey, J, Smolen, JR, Bowie, JV, Laveist, TA
JournalJ Urban Health
Volume92
Pagination83-92
Date PublishedFeb
ISBN Number1468-2869 (Electronic)1099-3460 (Linking)
Accession Number25168686
Abstract

Disparities in men's health research may inaccurately attribute differences in chronic conditions to race rather than the different health risk exposures in which men live. This study sought to determine whether living in the same social environment attenuates race disparities in chronic conditions among men. This study compared survey data collected in 2003 from black and white men with similar incomes living in a racially integrated neighborhood of Baltimore to data from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated to determine whether race disparities in chronic conditions were attenuated among men living in the same social environment. In the national sample, black men exhibited greater odds of having hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34, 1.86) and diabetes (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.27-2.08) than white men. In the sample of men living in the same social context, black and white respondents had similar odds of having hypertension (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.70, 1.59) and diabetes (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.57-2.22). There are no race disparities in chronic conditions among low-income, urban men living in the same social environment. Policies and interventions aiming to reduce disparities in chronic conditions should focus on modifying social aspects of the environment.

PMCID

PMC4338129