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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Association of substance use discussion by pediatric providers with the parent-provider relationship and maternal behavior change

TitleAssociation of substance use discussion by pediatric providers with the parent-provider relationship and maternal behavior change
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsGarg, A, Nelson, CS, Burrell, L, Duggan, AK, Sia, C
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume49
Pagination240-248
ISBN Number00099228 (ISSN)
KeywordsAdult, Alcohol-Related Disorders, alcoholism, article, behavior change, Child, clinical assessment, cohort analysis, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, cross-sectional study, Discussion, doctor patient relation, drug dependence, Female, Hawaii, human, Humans, major clinical study, Male, maternal behavior, Mothers, Parent-Child Relations, Parent-provider relationship, Parents, Patient Education, pediatrician, Pediatrics, Physician's Role, Primary Care Assessment Survey, Primary Health Care, Professional-Family Relations, Risk Factors, scoring system, Self Report, smoking, Socioeconomic Factors, substance abuse, substance use, Substance-Related Disorders, tobacco dependence, Young Adult
Abstract

A cross-sectional study of data from a randomized, controlled trial was conducted to determine (1) provider and parent attributes associated with discussion of maternal substance use, (2) how substance use discussion related to the parent-provider relationship, and (3) whether discussion was associated with maternal attempts at behavior change. Of the 482 mothers, 34% reported discussing all 3 substance use items (smoking, alcohol, and drug use) with their childg's provider. Mothers who discussed smoking were more likely to report discussing alcohol and other drug use (P <.001). Parent-provider relationship scores, measured by a modified version of the Primary Care Assessment Survey, were positively associated with discussion of each substance (P <.001). Discussion of smoking and drug use were significantly associated with attempted behavior change. Our findings suggest that discussion of parental substance use by pediatricians is positively associated with the parent-provider relationship and may lead to behavior change.