TabMenu

Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Association of midlife lipids with 20-year cognitive change: A cohort study

TitleAssociation of midlife lipids with 20-year cognitive change: A cohort study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsPower, MC, Rawlings, A, Sharrett, AR, Bandeen-Roche, K, Coresh, J, Ballantyne, CM, Pokharel, Y, Michos, ED, Penman, A, Alonso, A, Knopman, D, Mosley, TH, Gottesman, RF
JournalAlzheimers Dement
Date PublishedSep 12
ISBN Number1552-5260
Accession Number28916238
KeywordsCholesterol, Cognition, Cognitive change, cognitive decline, Cohort, Dementia, Epidemiology, Lipids, Longitudinal
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Existing studies predominantly consider the association of late-life lipid levels and subsequent cognitive change. However, midlife rather than late-life risk factors are often most relevant to cognitive health. METHODS: We quantified the association between measured serum lipids in midlife and subsequent 20-year change in performance on three cognitive tests in 13,997 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. RESULTS: Elevated total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were associated with greater 20-year decline on a test of executive function, sustained attention, and processing speed. Higher total cholesterol and triglycerides were also associated with greater 20-year decline in memory scores and a measure summarizing performance on all three tests. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was not associated with cognitive change. Results were materially unchanged in sensitivity analyses addressing informative missingness. DISCUSSION: Elevated total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides in midlife were associated with greater 20-year cognitive decline.