TabMenu

Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

The Association between Subjective Memory Complaints and Sleep within Older African American Adults

TitleThe Association between Subjective Memory Complaints and Sleep within Older African American Adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsGamaldo, AA, Wright, RS, Aiken-Morgan, AT, Allaire, JC, Thorpe, R. J., J, Whitfield, KE
JournalJ Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
Date PublishedJun 13
ISBN Number1079-5014
Accession Number28633326
KeywordsAfrican Americans, older adults, Sleep, Subjective memory complaints
Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the current study is to examine the association between subjective memory complaints and sleep (quantity and quality) in African American older adults. Method: Participants from the Baltimore Study of Black Aging (BSBA; n = 351; mean age = 71.99) completed a self-report sleep scale, subjective memory complaint scale, global cognitive status measure, and demographic questionnaire. Results: Worse overall sleep quality was significantly associated with subjective reports of difficulty recalling the placement of objects, recalling specific facts from reading materials, and worse memory currently compared to the past. Specific sleep parameters (e.g., longer sleep latency and shorter sleep duration) were associated with negative appraisals of participants' ability to do specific tasks involving memory (e.g., difficulty recalling placement of objects). Participants classified as poor sleepers (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI] total score > 5) were more likely to report worse memory now compared to the past than participants classified as good sleepers (PSQI total score