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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Association between race, place, and preventive health screenings among men: findings from the exploring health disparities in integrated communities study

TitleAssociation between race, place, and preventive health screenings among men: findings from the exploring health disparities in integrated communities study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsThorpe, R. J., J, Bowie, JV, Wilson-Frederick, SM, Coa, KI, Laveist, TA
JournalAm J Mens Health
Volume7
Pagination220-7
Date PublishedMay
ISBN Number1557-9891 (Electronic)1557-9883 (Linking)
Accession Number23184335
KeywordsAdult, African Americans/*statistics & numerical data, Cross-Sectional Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group/*statistics & numerical data, Health Behavior/ethnology, Health Status Disparities, Healthcare Disparities/*ethnology, Humans, Male, Men's Health/*ethnology, Middle Aged, Patient Acceptance of Health Care/*ethnology, Preventive Health Services/*utilization, Socioeconomic Factors, United States/epidemiology, Young Adult
Abstract

African American men consistently report poorer health and have lower participation rates in preventive screening tests than White men. This finding is generally attributed to race differences in access to care, which may be a consequence of the different health care markets in which African American and White men typically live. This proposition is tested by assessing race differences in use of preventive screenings among African American and White men residing within the same health care marketplace. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between race and physical, dental, eye and foot examinations, blood pressure and cholesterol checks, and colon and prostate cancer screenings in men in the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities in Southwest Baltimore Study. After adjusting for covariates, African American men had greater odds of having had a physical, dental, and eye examination; having had their blood pressure and cholesterol checked; and having been screened for colon and prostate cancer than White men. No race differences in having a foot examination were observed. Contrary to most findings, African American men had a higher participation rate in preventive screenings than White men. This underscores the importance of accounting for social context in public health campaigns targeting preventive screenings in men.

PMCID

PMC3632259