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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

The association between parent-reported provider communication quality and child obesity status: Variation by parent obesity and child race/ethnicity

TitleThe association between parent-reported provider communication quality and child obesity status: Variation by parent obesity and child race/ethnicity
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsWong, MS, Showell, NN, Bleich, SN, Gudzune, KA, Chan, KS
JournalPatient Educ Couns
Volume100
Pagination1588-1597
Date PublishedAug
ISBN Number1873-5134 (Electronic)0738-3991 (Linking)
Accession Number28318844
KeywordsHealth disparities, Obesity, Parent-reported pediatric provider communication
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between healthcare provider communication quality and child obesity status, and the role of parent obesity and child race/ethnicity regarding this association. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional secondary data analysis with the 2011-2013 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey of parents with children ages 6-12 (n=5390). We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association of parent-reported healthcare provider communication quality (explaining well, listening carefully, showing respect, and spending enough time) with child obesity status, and effect modification by parent obesity and child race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Parents of obese children were more likely to report that their child's healthcare provider listened carefully (OR=1.41, p=0.002) and spent enough time (OR=1.33, p=0.022) than parents of non-obese children. Non-obese parents of obese children experienced better communication in the domains of listening carefully (p<0.001) and spending enough time (p=0.007). Parents of obese non-Hispanic Asian children and non-Hispanic Black children were more likely to report that providers explained things well (p=0.043) and listened carefully (p=0.012), respectively. CONCLUSION: Parents of obese children experienced better communication if parents were non-obese or children were non-Hispanic Black or Asian. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Healthcare providers should ensure effective communication with obese parents of obese children.

PMCID

PMC5478425