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Poverty and InequalitySexual and Reproductive HealthFamily, Maternal & Child HealthMethodology

Adolescents' reports of communication with their parents about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control: 1988, 1995, and 2002

TitleAdolescents' reports of communication with their parents about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control: 1988, 1995, and 2002
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsRobert, AC, Sonenstein, FL
JournalThe Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Volume46
Pagination532-537
Date PublishedJun
ISBN Number1879-1972; 1054-139X
Accession Number20472209
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Communication, contraception, Data Collection, Female, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Sex Education, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: We examine trends in adolescents' reports of discussion with parents about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and birth control methods from 1988 to 2002. METHODS: Data from the 1988 and 1995 National Survey of Adolescent Males, and the 1988, 1995, and 2002 National Survey of Family Growth were analyzed to evaluate changes in discussions of female adolescents with parents about birth control methods and STDs, and changes in male adolescent discussions with parents about birth control methods. The sample includes never married males and females aged 15-17 years. RESULTS: In 2002, fewer female adolescents reported discussion with a parent about STD or birth control methods than in 1995. The share of female adolescents in 2002 reporting no discussion of either topic with their parents increased by almost half compared to 1995. Patterns across time in male adolescents' discussions of birth control methods with their parents appear stable. CONCLUSIONS: The recent decline in female adolescent reports of parent-communication about birth control and STDs, and the increase in female adolescent reports of no discussion of either topic suggest that public health officials, educators, and clinicians should invigorate their efforts to encourage parents to talk with their children about STDs and birth control.